Vintage Tumblr Themes

Once I leave college, I will be working in the tattoo shop mon/thurs/fri/sat, leaving tues/weds/sun free to work on my clothing company, and I will have evenings free for a part time job to help fund it. I hope to continue to collaborate with other artists in the process, and extend my business into buying and selling handpicked vintage items, and hopefully release a line of lingerie. 

To kickstart my business, I am hoping to create a collection for my final major project and exhibit it as if it were in a shop. I intend to create business cards/lookbooks/flyers to help advertise my company, and once the exhibition is over I will sell my collection through my etsy store:

www.loobilouu.etsy.com

So far I am advertising my company a lot through social media such as tumblr, facebook, instagram and twitter. This seems to be a very effective way to gain a following, and if my company expands enough I will look into registering the business and selling through my own website rather than through etsy.

Within my clothing company, I have been collaborating with various other artists to do photoshoots, and to create lookbooks for my collections. I have been making the clothes, styling the shoots, and at times modelling, then, with permission from the photographer, I have been posting the photos on my shop’s facebook page/tumblr/twitter/instagram and etsy.

When working with photographers, I found that a lot of legal requirements come into place, the most important of which being copyright laws. Copyright is and automatic legal right to protect original literary, dramatic, musical and artistic works. I may use the photographs from the shoot, but only with the permission of the photographer, and if I credit them as the owner of the work. On the other hand, they cannot publish the work commercially without permission from me as I, being the model, must give a model release. Along with not being used without permission from both the photographer or the model, these photos may not be manipulated in any way.


Photographs by Klaudia Debek.

Future Plans

After visiting degree shows last year at Nottingham Trent university, and looking on university websites at students work, I have decided that higher education is not the route for me. Instead, I have decided to carry on with my tattoo apprenticeship as a career option, and have also started work on my own clothing company.

I thought that this would be the right choice for me because I love many different aspects of art, and working in tattooing and fashion would allow me to work within various areas using different techniques and medias. I began by writing up an artist statement, which I will adapt and change as my work progresses, this being my first draft:


Ever since I can remember, music has always been a huge part of my life. It has influenced me both artistically, and in the way I dress, so it was only natural for me to take a strong interest in alternative fashion, which is often inspired by music. Through my work, I aim to bridge the gap between music and fashion, taking inspiration from past trends and bringing them up to date by putting my own take on them.

Along side fashion, I also am interested in the art of tattooing and am currently completing a tattoo apprenticeship in my free time. I am particularly interested in portraiture, and have been exploring both colour and black and grey pieces, as this is the area of tattooing which I intend to persue. Also, I am often inspired by Old School work, particularly pieces with a nautical theme, and more recent styles, such as dotwork and heavily lined, illustrative pieces.

In my most recent fashion work, I have been exploring High Fashion vs. D.I.Y Street Style. and have been looking at ways in which I can combine the two. This led me to design and make a very Vivienne Westwood-style tartan blazer with a very old-school, d.i.y. punk feel.

At present, I am trying to build up a strong portfolio of my textiles work, showing both the key points of the design process along with final garments. After completing my diploma, I aspire to set up a small clothing company influenced by my love of music and vintage fashion, perhaps resulting in a very psychobilly style.”

Since writing this, I have set up my clothing company, Shock Treatment Clothing, and am currently working on my first collection which is heavily inspired by 1950’s summer dresses/skirts, and makes use of vintage fabrics to create one-off pieces. I have been collaborating with photographers to create lookbooks, and will be styling a calender shoot at the end of the month.

http://shocktreatmentclothing.tumblr.com/

Portfolios

I decided to create two portfolios in which to display my best work; one for fashion/textiles work and one for drawings/paintings/etc. which would be relevant to my apprenticeship in tattooing. I have included textiles samples, final photographs, project work, independent work, lineworks, pencil drawings, paintings and photographs of finished tattoos which I have designed. My portfolios will be ever-changing as my work progresses and as I explore different working methods and techniques, whilst refining those which I already use.

These can be found here:

www.lucybentleyart.tumblr.com/tagged/tattoo

www.lucybentleyart.tumblr.com/tagged/textiles

NH Design is an international interior design company formed in 1980 by Nicky Haslam, reputedly Britains ”Ultimate designer.” The company is known for its opulent, high-end design, combining a contemporary outlook with historical charm to create bespoke furniture, fabrics, and accessories. 

I like his modern take on classic design, creating such opulence with such simple shapes and prints. Through his work, I have noticed how important attention to detail is as this is what seems to create the ”high-end” feel, and would like to create something inspired by this project of his in London with my own prints:

”Liberty is one of the last great emporiums for innovative and eclectic design. Situated in the heart of London since 1875, it remains to this day the destination of choice for the savvy and sophisticated shopper.
At Liberty, a rich heritage combines with the cutting edge and avant-garde, making each visit a voyage of discovery and excitement.”
http://www.liberty.co.uk/AboutLiberty/article/fcp-content
I feel that my prints would fit in well with their style, especially as in the 1920’s it was widely associated with the arts and crafts movement, elements of which can be seen in my work.  I also like how it is very designer-oriented and how the website explores the inspiration behind the print collections, not just the face of the prints themselves. I feel that my work could offer another way to inspire the customer, as what I have created is something which combines subjects which are usually considered to be ”ugly” and in turn have made them into something beautiful. 

”Liberty is one of the last great emporiums for innovative and eclectic design. Situated in the heart of London since 1875, it remains to this day the destination of choice for the savvy and sophisticated shopper.

At Liberty, a rich heritage combines with the cutting edge and avant-garde, making each visit a voyage of discovery and excitement.”

http://www.liberty.co.uk/AboutLiberty/article/fcp-content

I feel that my prints would fit in well with their style, especially as in the 1920’s it was widely associated with the arts and crafts movement, elements of which can be seen in my work.  I also like how it is very designer-oriented and how the website explores the inspiration behind the print collections, not just the face of the prints themselves. I feel that my work could offer another way to inspire the customer, as what I have created is something which combines subjects which are usually considered to be ”ugly” and in turn have made them into something beautiful. 

”Folk of London is an interior design studio and shop offering inspiring and eclectic décor, furniture and wares.

Launched in 2012 by Catherine Carpenter and Patricia Arias, two design industry professionals with a passion for living and working in London. 

London is vibrant and cutting edge with a strong tradition of designers and local makers. Our spirit combined with a passion for travel derives our characterful and unconventional style.

We welcome all types of interior design projects. Originality, attention to detail and client services are crucial. We manage the whole scheme from brief, detailed design to completion. 

We also design and create our own brand of furniture, lighting and accessories.

Our shop style is explorative, evocative and exotic, taking a fusion of textiles, patterns and colours inspired by travels with a London twist and respect for traditional craftsmanship.”

I feel that my prints would fit in with the ideas behind this shop, and the very neutral, earthy colour palette which I used would compliment their range of prints/furniture/accessories well. I think that the originality of my final textiles samples would definitely work well in creating pieces of furniture and home accessories, and are ideal to create a very over the top, eclectic look.

Now that I had created a range of wall coverings and textiles swatches, I was faced with thinking up how to present them. I thought that the best way in which to do this would be to bring them together in a book like those found in decorating centres, such as Dulux. This would allow me to display my samples side by side, so that they could inspire interior design and furnishings. 

However, I feel that my prints are not very commercial, so would not be found in larger decorating companies. I do think that they would better suit independent companies/designers, or high end stores, such as Nash, Liberty’s of London, and Folk of London.

I created two pieces of knit as alternative fabric swatches to the prints, yet still following my colour palette. I really like these pieces and the skeletal feel about them, reminding me a lot of a ribcage. These would work well both on their own, or as an overlay for a plain fabric, ideal for cushions/blankets/beddings/throws. I particularly like how the metallic yarn catches the light, and the textures some of the yarns create. These would contrast well against the smooth calico prints.

I created two pieces of knit as alternative fabric swatches to the prints, yet still following my colour palette. I really like these pieces and the skeletal feel about them, reminding me a lot of a ribcage. These would work well both on their own, or as an overlay for a plain fabric, ideal for cushions/blankets/beddings/throws. I particularly like how the metallic yarn catches the light, and the textures some of the yarns create. These would contrast well against the smooth calico prints.